Home > Devotionals, General Posts > Living out the Great Commission in Work-Based Friendships

Living out the Great Commission in Work-Based Friendships

  • If you work with other Christians, occasionally meet during lunch or sometime to pray for the conversion of the lost and for the planting of sound churches in the underserved and unreached areas around the world.
    • If you have Christian friends, meet with them occasionally to talk about your own experiences in evangelism and discipleship. Share resources with them and form a sort of bond of accountability if your friendship is deep enough for that.
    • Work with fellow believers—even those who are not members of your church or who may even be in a different denomination—to support mercy ministries in your local area.

The GCRTF’s final report has passed at the SBC national convention in Florida! Praise be to God! Joyfully, we may now continue the Great Commission Living series (for all Christians, not just Southern Baptists) with how to live out the Great Commission in your work-based Christian friendships.

  • If you work with other Christians, occasionally meet during lunch or sometime to pray for the conversion of the lost and for the planting of sound churches in the underserved and unreached areas around the world.

This bullet is largely self-explanatory. Take the time to pray with your Christian colleagues at work for the conversion of the lost and for the planting of sound churches both locally and around the world. Indeed, this has a Scriptural mandate, for our Lord commands us His disciples in Matthew 9:37-38 to “pray earnestly to the Lord of the harvest to send out laborers into his harvest” because “the harvest is plentiful, but the laborers are few.” If we wish to see a great life-giving work of the Spirit of God, we must pray for Him to convert the lost and work through Christians to plant sound churches.

  • If you have Christian friends, meet with them occasionally to talk about your own experiences in evangelism and discipleship. Share resources with them and form a sort of bond of accountability if your friendship is deep enough for that.

This bullet is particularly useful with Christian friends from your own congregation, although if you must use Christian friends outside your congregation, that certainly is not a sin. The Christian pastor John Donne rightly noted that “no man is an island”; we are all in need of accountability. Therefore, meet with a Christian friend occasionally “to talk about your own experiences in evangelism and discipleship.” Have a relationship of accountability with someone. (This will be covered more fully in the final GCL post.)

And share Christian resources you have with other Christian friends who you’re not in a discipleship relationship with.

  • Work with fellow believers—even those who are not members of your church or who may even be in a different denomination—to support mercy ministries in your local area.

This is a great way to provide Christian witness to the unbelieving community. In John 14:35, Jesus says, “By this all people will know that you are my disciples, if you have love for one another.” Christians from different backgrounds who unite “to support mercy ministries in your local area” crush the notion that churches war against one another. As people hear the gospel, your partnership with other Christians to clothe the homeless, visit the sick, etc., will confirm your gospel message. Doing mercy ministries isn’t the same as sharing the gospel, but partnering with other Christians to do mercy ministries can bolster and affirm the gospel you do share.

Live out the Great Commission by talking about the gospel—and your experiences from it—with other people at your workplace (or school).

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