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Radically Pursuing Great Commission Living

  • Devote yourself to a radical pursuit of the Great Commission in the context of obeying the Great Commandments of loving God and loving others.
    • Develop strategies as an individual for praying for, serving, sharing the gospel and discipling neighbors, coworkers, and others with whom you come into regular contact.
    • As a family, pray for, serve, and share the gospel with neighbors, coworkers, and others with whom family members come into regular contact.
    • Bear witness to the Gospel through personal evangelism, seeing every individual as a sinner in need of the salvation that comes through Jesus Christ alone.
    • Personally grow in giving as an act of good stewardship and financial faith.

We must radically pursue Great Commission living in our own lives. The gospel radically changes us. 2 Corinthians 5:17 declares that every Christian is “a new creation” in Christ Jesus! Since we have been radically changed, we should radically pursue sharing the gospel and making disciples “in the context of obeying the Great Commandments of loving God and loving others.” Jesus called us to this radical life of love in Luke 6:27-31.

“But I say to you who hear, Love your enemies, do good to those who hate you, bless those who curse you, pray for those who abuse you. To one who strikes you on the cheek, offer the other also, and from one who takes away your cloak do not withhold your tunic either. Give to everyone who begs from you, and from one who takes away your goods do not demand them back. And as you wish that others would do to you, do so to them.

Verse 31 sums up Jesus’ teaching in the prior verses: “as you wish that others would do to you, do so to them.” We Christians have heard the gospel. Someone loved God enough and loved us enough to share the gospel with us. If we are glad that someone shared the gospel with us, so should we share the gospel with others! The GCTF’s Final Report gives us four helpful ways that we can radically pursue this sort of loving others by sharing the gospel.

  • Develop strategies as an individual for praying for, serving, sharing the gospel and discipling neighbors, coworkers, and others with whom you come into regular contact.

Before you do anything regarding evangelism and discipleship, develop a strategy. Pray for God’s wisdom (James 1:5). Take the time to think about what you want to do. Take time to determine the need. Be intentional about what you do—and to be intentional you must first “develop strategies” thoughtfully and prayerfully.

  • As a family, pray for, serve, and share the gospel with neighbors, coworkers, and others with whom family members come into regular contact.

Great Commission living starts in the home. As a family, you can pray for the unsaved people God has placed in your life. Once bathed in prayer, you can begin to engage these unsaved people and shower them with love by developing friendships with them. Paul writes in Romans 12:13-15 that we are to “seek to show hospitality. Bless those who persecute you; bless and do not curse them. Rejoice with those who rejoice, weep with those who weep.” We as Christians should show hospitality and go to people in order to witness to them. “Pray for, serve, and share the gospel” with the unsaved people God has placed in your life.

  • Bear witness to the Gospel through personal evangelism, seeing every individual as a sinner in need of the salvation that comes through Jesus Christ alone.

We must realize the lostness of those around us. We must come face-to-face with the reality of hell. Jonathan Edwards realized the reality of hell and preached the well-known sermon Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God. Yes, it is a sermon about hell, but the end of that sermon presents Jesus Christ as the only hope of the condemned sinner. If we truly realize that everyone outside of Jesus Christ is going to hell (John 14:6, Romans 3:10-12), then how can we neglect to share the gospel with them? If we have a proper view of sin, and a fuller knowledge of Jesus Christ, we will be like Peter and John, who “cannot but speak of what we have seen and heard” (Acts 4:20).

  • Personally grow in giving as an act of good stewardship and financial faith.

Paul had this to say of the Philippians in Philippians 4:18-19. Their gifts were “a fragrant offering, a sacrifice acceptable and pleasing to God. And my God will supply every need of yours according to his riches in glory in Christ Jesus.” Notice how the Philippians’ financial gift to Paul pleased God and that Paul replied with the assurance that God “will supply every need of yours.” Christian giving was the norm of the early Church, not the afterthought that it is today. Tithing is a wonderful thing, but many churchgoers give only a fourth of that, 2.5%. Where is the joyful and sacrificial giving that marked early Christians? As Paul wrote of the Philippians in 2 Corinthians 8:3 that “they gave according to their means, as I can testify, and beyond their means, of their own accord.”

Paul concludes the matter of Christian giving in 2 Corinthians 9:10-11. “He who supplies seed to the sower and bread for food will supply and multiply your seed for sowing and increase the harvest of your righteousness. You will be enriched in every way to be generous in every way, which through us will produce thanksgiving to God.” God gives to us so that we will give to others, “to be generous in every way.”

For a fuller treatment of Christian giving (and how contentment causes giving), you can listen to my recent sermon on Philippians 4:9-23. (And speaking of Philippians, I hope to have all my sermons on Philippians relocated to mypodcast.com by the end of the summer.)

Categories: General Posts

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