Home > Bible Commentary, General Posts > The Light of the World Gives Light

The Light of the World Gives Light

Last spring I had the joy of comparing and contrasting John 5 and 9 for my Introduction to the New Testament online class at the University of Alabama, and tomorrow night I’ll have the much greater pleasure to present Jesus as “the light of the world” to the youth who come for our weekly Bible study at Calvary Baptist Church at 6 P.M. What jumps out at me most in this chapter of John’s Gospel is how Jesus is “the light of the world” at the beginning of the chapter, and at the end of the chapter he reveals himself to be the Son of Man who opens and shuts spiritual eyes.

The Saving Light of the World

Jesus has been at the Feast of Tabernacles in Jerusalem (John 7:1-8:59). Jesus has spoken to crowds (7:1-36), Pharisees have tried to arrest him (7:37-52), and Jesus has declared his unique Sonship to God as opposed to his opponent’s true sonship to Satan (8:12-59). Upon Jesus’ inflammatory words at the end of John 8, the crowd listening to him picked up stones to throw at him, but Jesus flees.

As he passed by, he saw a man blind from birth. And his disciples asked him, “Rabbi, who sinned, this man or his parents, that he was born blind?” Jesus answered, “It was not that this man sinned, or his parents, but that the works of God might be displayed in him. We must work the works of him who sent me while it is day; night is coming, when no one can work. As long as I am in the world, I am the light of the world.” Having said these things, he spit on the ground and made mud with the saliva. Then he anointed the man’s eyes with the mud and said to him, “Go, wash in the pool of Siloam” (which means Sent). So he went and washed and came back seeing. (9:1-7)

Jesus comes across a blind man and answers his disciples’ question in a rather surprising way. The disciples want to apportion blame for the man’s blindness. Like Job’s three “friends,” Jesus’ twelve disciples believe that physical maladies are a direct result of particular sin, of “either this man or his parents.” They understand that sin brought disease and death into the world, but they do not understand that a physical ailment is not necessarily a direct result of a person’s particular sin. Jesus, however, understands perfectly. This man has been blind from birth “that the works of God might be displayed in him.” The disciples see a product of condemning sin; Jesus sees raw material for a God-glorifying miracle.

Jesus reminds his disciples that their mission, his mission, is one of restoration, not retribution. While Jesus is on earth, the disciples must join him “in working the works of him who sent me,” i.e., God the Father. And this unique work that Jesus does while he is on earth is to heal people physically in order to reveal their deeper need for spiritual healing. It is this unique work that Jesus does in giving this blind man sight for the first time in his life. Jesus does not judge the man and condemn him to continued blindness (which itself is a merciful sentence even for the man’s sinful nature irregardless of particular sins); rather, Jesus restores the man. He gives him sight!

The Blind Pharisees

The healed man’s neighbors and people who knew about his previous condition were blind to his healing. They were confused and did not know whether this man was the same man they had seen before (vv. 8-12). To settle the matter, they bring the man to the Pharisees for questioning. As in John 5, the Pharisees are upset that Jesus healed a man on a Sabbath, and they want to catch Jesus in a sin. In questioning the healed man, the Pharisees become confused within their ranks. They resort to asking the man’s opinion of Jesus, but the man affirms that Jesus is “a prophet”–certainly an answer the Pharisees weren’t wanting (vv. 13-17)!

In desperation, the Pharisees call in the man’s parents for questioning; perhaps the crowd was right that this man hadn’t been healed at all. But the parents are so scared of the Pharisees that they tell them to go back and ask their son again (vv. 18-23).

The Pharisees at this point are desperate and exasperated. They question the healed man for a second time, but they are blind to the simple sight of the healed man: Jesus healed him, and God wouldn’t have allowed a charlatan to do so (vv. 24-34)!

The Judging Son of Man

What the healed man’s parents feared for themselves happens to their son: the Pharisees “cast him out” of the synagogue (v. 34).

Jesus heard that they had cast him out, and having found him he said, “Do you believe in the Son of Man?” He answered, “And who is he, sir, that I may believe in him?” Jesus said to him, “You have seen him, and it is he who is speaking to you.” He said, “Lord, I believe,” and he worshiped him. Jesus said, “For judgment I came into this world, that those who do not see may see, and those who see may become blind.” Some of the Pharisees near him heard these things, and said to him, “Are we also blind?” Jesus said to them, “If you were blind, you would have no guilt; but now that you say, ‘We see,’ your guilt remains. (vv. 35-41)

The blind man, for all his boldness before the Pharisees, had spoken better than he knew. He still didn’t see his deeper spiritual need. And this is why Jesus comes to him a second time. Jesus invites the blind man who can now see him to see him for who he really is: the Son of Man.

Yes, as the Son of Man, Jesus came to save (John 10), but he also came to judge. “For judgment I came into this world, that those who do not see may see, and those who see may become blind,” Jesus says to the healed man who now trusts Jesus for spiritual healing even as he had trusted Jesus for physical healing. But lo and behold, some Pharisees overhear and are paranoid: are they those with “sight” but who are really blind? Jesus’ answer is a resounding “Yes!” Physical sight ultimately means nothing if one does not have spiritual sight. To use an argument in line with Jesus’ teaching, it is better to enter heaven blind than to enter hell eyes wide open. Indeed, it is the spiritually blind who see their blindness and ask Jesus to heal them of it that Jesus heals. It is those who think they see and consequently spurn the salvation in Jesus Christ alone who will be judged eternally on the Last Day.

This is what strikes me so much about John 9. Jesus is the light of the world. He gives us sight despite our blindness, life despite our death, faith despite our unbelief. It is as Paul writes in 2 Corinthians 4:6, “God, who said, ‘Let light shine out of darkness,’ has shone in our hearts to give the light of the knowledge of the glory of God in the face of Jesus Christ.” Praise God for the free salvation he has given us despite our sin! Praise God for the free sight he has given us despite our blindness! Praise God for the adoption he has given us despite our previous status as children of the devil and slaves of sin! Praise God! Praise God!

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